Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans, Jean Pfaelzer

Guided Reading Questions


Useful Websites

Chinese Immigration, Library of Congress, American Memory Collection
http://memory.loc.gov/learn/features/immig/chinese6.html

Chinese Exclusion Acts Annotated Bibliography and Book Samples from Questia.com
http://www.questia.com/library/history/united-states-history/asian-american-history/chinese-exclusion-acts.jsp

Website of the Chinese-American Museum
http://www.camla.org/index.htm

Chinese Exclusion Act Curriculum Website, Maryland State Archives

http://teachingamericanhistorymd.net/000001/000000/000136/html/t136.html
This website is rich in primary sources related to the Chinese Exclusion Act. It contains a number of primary source political cartoons.

The Chinese in California, 1850 - 1925, Collection Connections, The Learning Page, Library of Congress
http://memory.loc.gov/learn/collections/chinese/index.html
This is a very teacher friendly sight designed to go along with the first link to the Chinese Immigration collection of the Library of Congress American Memory Collection. This site provides a wide variety of primary sources including numerous political cartoons and photographs, most of which are directly related to the content of Driven Out. Questions and historical context are provided for each source.

Remembering 1882, Microsite, Chinese Historical Society of America
http://www.civilrightssuite.org/1882/
This website supports the "Remembering 1882" exhibit of the Chinese Historical Society of America. It explains the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 through primary source images and documents. A timeline provides the background and aftermath of the 1882 Exclusion Act.

Analyzing Political Cartoons
Driven Out and many of the resources linked above contain political cartoons that were created to highlight Chinese immigration and its effects. The following websites provide strategies and worksheets related to political cartoon analysis.

"It's No Laughing Matter: Analyzing Political Cartoons, The Learning Page, Library of Congress
http://memory.loc.gov/learn/features/political_cartoon/cag.html
This site provides an overview of how to analyze a political cartoon. It explains symbolism, exaggeration, labeling, irony, and analogy, along with providing guided questions for cartoon analysis.

Scholars in Action: Michael O'Malley Analyzes a Cartoon, History Matters, George Mason University
http://historymatters.gmu.edu/mse/sia/omalley.htm#
While not related to the Chinese Exclusion Act, this site provides an historian's introduction to political cartoon analysis. It contains short audio clips on reading and understanding political cartoons.

Cartoon Analysis Worksheet, National Archives and Records Administration
http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/worksheets/cartoon.html